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Monthly Archives: August 2017

Glassell Park Real Estate

Glassell Park is a moderately diverse neighborhood located in Northeast Los Angeles. Glassell Park resides south of Glendale, west of Eagle Rock and northeast of Mount Washington. This neighborhood is quite hilly and provides its residents with astounding views. During the housing boom of 2000 a large group of middle-class people moved to Glassell Park because of the inexpensive cost and abundance of Craftsman homes. The average temperature for the hottest month of the year, July, is 73 degrees. The average temperature for the coldest month of the year, December, is 57 degrees. January is the month with the most precipitation at 4.6 inches.

Area Vibes awarded Glassell Park a livability score of 72, very livable, which is higher than the national average of 70. Walk Score says that Glassell Park is a 61, with a transit score of 44 and a bike score of 38. Therefore, Glassell Park is somewhat walkable, and some errands can be accomplished by walking. There is some public transportation with a score and not many bike lanes.

According to the 2000 U.S. Census, there were 23,467 residents within the 2.75 square mile neighborhood. This equates to 8,524 people per square mile, which is average density for Los Angeles. The ethnicity break down was as follows: Latinos: 66.1%, Whites: 13.7%, Asians: 17.4%, Blacks: 1.4% and others 1.4%. 51.5% of its residents were born abroad with the highest two being Mexico, 49.3% and the Philippines, 16.2%. The average age for residents was 30; this is average for the city and county of Los Angeles. 19% of the residents who are 25 and older have earned a four-year degree. There was 4.8% of the population listed as veterans.

The median household income in Glassell Park was $50,098, which is an average figure for the city and county of Los Angeles. The average household size is higher compared to most parts of Los Angeles at 3.3 people. This is 21% higher than the national average. Renters reside in 56.2% of the housing stock; this is 55% higher than the national average. Owners are the remaining 43.8%, these figures are 30% lower than the national average.

According to Zillow, Glassell Park homes are valued on average at $713,700. This is a 9.3% increase from last year and they expect it to raise another 2.6% next year. The average price of homes on the market is $675,000; this is 148% higher than the national average. The market health is rated at 3.8 out of 10 in comparison to other markets across the county. The average price per square foot is $499, which is higher than the Los Angeles average of $448. The current market temperature is “cool” which is ideal for the Buyer’s market. The average price of rent is $2,900, which is 33% higher than the national average.

Altadena Real Estate

Altadena is charming community located directly north of Pasadena at the base of the Angeles National Forest San Gabriel Mountains. Altadena is an unincorporated and 14 miles northeast from Downtown Los Angeles. This warm, Mediterranean climate has hot and dry summers that average highs of 91 degrees. The winters are essentially warm and windy with the lowest average temperature of 44 degrees. Altadena averages 21 inches of rainfall annually.

According to the 2010 U.S. Census – Altadena had a population of 42,777 people. With 8.71 square miles to share there were 4,909.6 people per square mile. This is average for Los Angeles County. The population was more diverse compared to other areas of the county with the dominate ethnicity being White at 52.8%, followed by 26.9% Latino, 23.7% Black, 5.4% Asian and 0.7% American Indian.

The population of Altadena is well educated in comparison to the rest of the county with 45.6% of residents aged 25 and up with a four year degree and 87.9% with a high school diploma. In regards to the male population: 57.8% were married, 32.9% had never been married, 7.1% had been divorced and 2.1% were widowed. The female population had53.9% who were married, 24.4% had never been married, 12.4% were divorced and 9.4% were widowed. The average age of Altadena was 37, which is an older average age compared to the rest of Los Angeles County. 9.8% of the people in population were veterans and 20.8% of residents were born in a foreign country. The average commute to work was 27.5 minutes. Altadena has a Walk Score of 48 out of 100 meaning that it is a car dependent city.

The average household size was 2.8 people, which was 9% higher than the national average. Approximately 74.6% of residents owned their homes. This was 10% higher than the national average. 25.4% of the population rented from a house, apartment or condominium. The 2010 Census declared there being 15,518 households with a median household income of $83,917. This is high compared to Los Angeles County.

Altadena real estate isn’t cheap, however. The median price of homes for sale in Altadena is $780,000. This is 226% higher than the national average. However, the average home value is $731,400. The price per square foot is $485. The current housing market “temperature” is neutral. Last year the home values increased by 8.1% and Zillow predicts they will rise only 1.9% within the next year. The average monthly rent is $2,921. This is 53% higher than the national average. The current housing market health is 6.9/10. This is healthy score given by Zillow in comparison to other housing markets across the country.According to Area Vibes, Altadena has a livability score of 77 – extremely livable. This is higher than the national average of 70.

How to Attract Success

I had the most amazing experience last year at the Denver and Minnesota Success Summits. For those of you that I was lucky enough to present to, you know that over time I have focused my energy on teaching skills, techniques, and strategies to help you get rich in real estate. I gave my first presentation to a live audience in 2006, and have since taught thousands of investors how to make money. I have written countless articles, reports, and a book. I love getting notes in the mail, emails, or people approaching me telling me how I helped change their life. Someone told me that my book helped them make an additional $50,000 this past year alone. You can probably tell that I have a passion and am driven to help people reach their goals, and now I understand that I was missing a very important piece to this mission. Most people need more than skills, techniques and strategies. Many can acquire all the information they need to make a fortune and still be broke. What most people need is the understanding of what it actually takes to be successful.

At this year’s Success Summits, I tried something new. I tried to breakdown the fear that prevents us from taking action and tried to give techniques on how to move forward past the fear. I had a lot of fun with the presentation, but it also pulled a lot of emotion out of me and the audience. Multiple people told me I touched them, and it was the exact presentation they needed to hear as the try to jump start their investing. I think one of the reasons I had several people approach me in tears is because they know they have not been taking action, to avoid pain, and all that has created in their life is more pain. That is a hard thing for someone to realize. My guess is people left that presentation being hard on themselves. That is not the point. The point is, now they understand what was holding them back so that they can implement strategies to propel themselves forward. The past is the past, and serves only as an educator for the greatness that is about to come.

If you attended the presentation, you learned that our decisions are based on one of two driving forces. Pursuit of pleasure or the avoidance of pain. We talked about pain being a stronger force, and can easily dominate our decision making. The thought of experiencing pain, even if it is not physical, is scary; which is where the fear that stops us stems.

How to Attract Success

I had the most amazing experience last year at the Denver and Minnesota Success Summits. For those of you that I was lucky enough to present to, you know that over time I have focused my energy on teaching skills, techniques, and strategies to help you get rich real estate. I gave my first presentation to a live audience in 2006, and have since taught thousands of investors how to make money. I have written countless articles, reports, and a book. I love getting notes in the mail, emails, or people approaching me telling me how I helped change their life. Someone told me that my book helped them make an additional $50,000 this past year alone. You can probably tell that I have a passion and am driven to help people reach their goals, and now I understand that I was missing a very important piece to this mission. Most people need more than skills, techniques and strategies. Many can acquire all the information they need to make a fortune and still be broke. What most people need is the understanding of what it actually takes to be successful.

At this year’s Success Summits, I tried something new. I tried to breakdown the fear that prevents us from taking action and tried to give techniques on how to move forward past the fear. I had a lot of fun with the presentation, but it also pulled a lot of emotion out of me and the audience. Multiple people told me I touched them, and it was the exact presentation they needed to hear as the try to jump start their investing. I think one of the reasons I had several people approach me in tears is because they know they have not been taking action, to avoid pain, and all that has created in their life is more pain. That is a hard thing for someone to realize. My guess is people left that presentation being hard on themselves. That is not the point. The point is, now they understand what was holding them back so that they can implement strategies to propel themselves forward. The past is the past, and serves only as an educator for the greatness that is about to come.

If you attended the presentation, you learned that our decisions are based on one of two driving forces. Pursuit of pleasure or the avoidance of pain. We talked about pain being a stronger force, and can easily dominate our decision making. The thought of experiencing pain, even if it is not physical, is scary; which is where the fear that stops us stems.